Dhea for low t

What then do we do? My take on all of the above: DHEA is a steroid hormone produced by our adrenal glands . It’s a precursor to the male hormone testosterone and to estrogen, one of the key female hormones. So the first thing that comes to mind is that your falling DHEA levels are a way your adrenals ask for attention. They say: we’re exhausted and overworked, and as such production is down. Taking DHEA might temporarily make you feel more energized, and thus energized, you will then continue the lifestyle that triggered the problem, without addressing the underlying cause of the imbalance. In other words, your body’s call for help is silenced.

Side effects will differ between men and women, and are usually dose dependent. Women tend to convert excess DHEA into testosterone, which can lead to acne and facial hair growth. Men tend to convert the excess DHEA into estrogen, which can cause decreased libido or fatigue. Those experiencing the presence of these side effects, or a lack of effect, should have their blood levels monitored to reevaluate dosage. DHEA also comes as 7-keto DHEA. This alternative can be appealing to males as it doesn’t have the downstream conversion to estrogen.

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Although research on the safety of long-term or regular use of DHEA is currently lacking, there's some concern that it may alter liver function, interfere with cholesterol control, affect hormone levels (such as insulin, thyroid hormones, and adrenal hormones), and increase the risk of blood clots. Therefore, people with liver disease, diabetes, high cholesterol, thyroid disorders, blood clotting disorders, hormonal disorders, or hormone-sensitive conditions (such as breast cancer and prostate cancer) should take caution when using DHEA. Those with a history of heart disease or stroke should avoid DHEA supplements.

Dhea for low t

dhea for low t

Although research on the safety of long-term or regular use of DHEA is currently lacking, there's some concern that it may alter liver function, interfere with cholesterol control, affect hormone levels (such as insulin, thyroid hormones, and adrenal hormones), and increase the risk of blood clots. Therefore, people with liver disease, diabetes, high cholesterol, thyroid disorders, blood clotting disorders, hormonal disorders, or hormone-sensitive conditions (such as breast cancer and prostate cancer) should take caution when using DHEA. Those with a history of heart disease or stroke should avoid DHEA supplements.

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